Medication Assistance Treatment

WHAT IS IT?

The MAT (Medication Assisted Treatment) Program at Retreat Behavioral Health uses medications in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies for the treatment of substance use disorders. There are multiple medications that can help with cravings for drugs and/or alcohol. Enclosed you will find some information on the anti-craving options we offer. If you are interested in the MAT Program, we can get you started before you leave in-patient treatment.

NALTREXONE/VIVITROL

Naltrexone (Revia) is an anti-craving medication for both opiate and alcohol addiction. It is a once daily pill. It is also available as a once a month intramuscular injection called Vivitrol. These medications are opiate antagonists so you should not use any opiate product because you will go into precipitated withdrawal. These medications decrease cravings for alcohol and completely blocks the absorption of opiates. Liver function studies should be done before starting this medication.

Some potential side effects may include:

  • GI Upset such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gas, and/or dry mouth.
  • Dizziness
  • Anxiety or nervousness
  • Injection site reactions (Vivitrol)
  • Headache

CAMPRAL

Campral (Acamprosate) helps to restore normal function of the alcoholic brain, which has been changed by long-term alcohol misuse. This is an oral medication taken as two pills, three times daily with food.

Some potential side effects may include:

  • GI Upset such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gas, and/or dry mouth.
  • Anxiety or nervousness
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Injection site reactions (Vivitrol)

ANTABUSE

Antabuse can treat problem drinking by creating an unpleasant reaction to alcohol. Antabuse is an alcohol antagonist and you should not use any alcohol-containing products. Consuming alcohol can lead to unpleasant and severe symptoms such as flushing, nausea, vomiting, headache, sweating, dizziness, and others. Antabuse comes in pill form with two strengths and is taken once daily. Liver function studies should be done before starting and periodically while taking this medication.

Some potential side effects may include:

  • Drowsiness/tiredness
  • Headache
  • Acne

BUPRENORPHINE

Buprenorphine is a narcotic that is a partial opioid agonist so it can both activate and block opioid receptors in the brain. Buprenorphine can be used under the tongue by monthly injection (Sublocade). Liver function studies should be done before taking this medication and periodically as decided by the provider.

Some potential side effects may include:

  • Sleepiness
  • Opioid addiction
  • Decrease in respiratory rate
  • Injection site reactions (Sublocade)
  • Low blood pressure
  • Application site reactions (Butrans)

Medication: Only One Piece To The Puzzle

It is important to remember medication alone will not be enough to keep you sober. You should continue to meet with your therapist, attend groups, and follow your established treatment plan for recovery.

Retreat believes in providing a variety of options for recovery. MAT offers the patient additional support, allowing them and their provider to work together to determine the next best step in their recovery. It is important for the patient to meet with a therapist and follow an established treatment plan for recovery.

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